Tag Archives: Weather/Climate

A Sierra fishing guide shares his tips on what you can expect from replenished lakes and streams

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By Chris ErskineContact Reporter MAMMOTH LAKES, CA: Hot Creek Ranch is located in the beautiful Eastern Sierras of California. It is Los Angeles Times For a change, Sierra creeks and lakes will be full of water, and fat fish, as trout season opens. For a change, Sierra creeks and lakes will be full of water,… Continue reading

Chinook salmon spawning season improves

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Bettina Boxall, Contact Reporter The picture has brightened slightly for endangered winter-run Chinook salmon after two disastrous spawning seasons. The number of juveniles migrating downstream this fall is roughly twice what it was last year, thanks to better temperature conditions in the Sacramento River. “We’re declaring success on maintaining temperatures,” said Maria Rea, a regional… Continue reading

California’s Fish Emergency

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Three-quarters of the state’s native fish are in trouble, and options for recovery have been constrained by the drought. We talked to Peter Moyle—an eminent fish biologist at UC Davis’s Center for Watershed Sciences and a member of the PPIC Water Policy Center research network—about what can be done to bring native fish back from… Continue reading

In Hot Water: Climate Change is Affecting North American Fish

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Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America — including some fish that are popular with anglers. Scientists are seeing a variety of changes in how inland fish reproduce, grow and where they can live. Climate change is already affecting inland fish across North America — including some fish that are popular with… Continue reading

What’s eating the salmon?

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Water managers have been saying for years that California’s salmon population is under attack by non-native predatory fish. Now there is science to prove it. In a report on April 19 to the State Water Resources Control Board, the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration’s Sean Hayes, whose doctorate is in ecology and evolutionary biology, talked… Continue reading

El Nino weakens a tad, but we won’t feel that for months

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By SETH BORENSTEIN, AP Science Writer WASHINGTON (AP) — Meteorologists see signs that the super El Nino is weakening ever so slightly, but they caution months will pass before people in the Americas will feel it. The World Meteorological Organization said Thursday that El Nino has passed its peak based on specific temperature, wind, and… Continue reading

LA Aqueduct flows after dam built for drought is dismantled

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By BRIAN MELLEY, Associated Press OLANCHA, Calif. (AP) — Water in the aqueduct that helped fuel Los Angeles’ growth was flowing toward the city Wednesday for the first time in six months after workers removed an earthen and concrete dam that had diverted runoff to the parched Owens Valley. With little mountain runoff due to… Continue reading

Saving Native Fishes from Extinction

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Native fishes have been hit hard by the drought, with 18 species—including many salmon runs—at high risk of extinction if warm, dry conditions persist. But there are actions we can take now to avert what could be the largest loss of native freshwater fish biodiversity since the arrival of Europeans in California. The state and… Continue reading